Idler in Europe


George David on board his steed, the IMS50 footer Idler
 

George David on board his steed, the IMS50 footer Idler

We speak to owner of the 1999 Admiral's Cup George David about his program and the prospect of a new boat
Aside from George Kahlbetzer's Bumble Bee 5 from Australia, the boat second furthest away from home at last week's Rolex IMS Offshore Championship was George David's Nelson/Marek 50, Idler normally based in Newport, Rhode Island. Idler was the only American boat taking part in the supposed IMS World championship. So what was Idler doing so far from home? "It's clear that the best IMS competition is in Europe," David explained to The Daily Sail. "The number of IMS certificates in the US is relatively small. I guess it has gone up in the last year or two, but it was in decline for several years before that. The toughest competition in IMS is clearly here in the Mediterranean." While one design racing in Melges or any number of Farr designs has become the most popular expression of big boat sailing in the States, David says he prefers handicap racing. "We wish Europe was a little closer," he says. "Americans are not doing IMS anymore. Fundamentally Americans are doing one designs and have had great success in the Farr 40 class in particular." He adds: "I've always had IMS boats and I like the idea about design." But he admits that campaigning Idler has become tough because of her age. "This boat is in its fifth year and it is pretty clear that you need to be inside three years because there is a design evolution just about every second year. But we knew that. Everybody comes to an event with an expectation of doing well and you work hard and everyone is motivated but when you are in the fifth year of the program you have to pay attention to the fact that's it's going to be tough." This is David's fourth Idler, following an IOR quarter tonner in the late 1980s, a

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