Gilles Martin-Raget / Oracle Racing

Oracle Racing crew go swimming

Second AC45 capsize on an action-packed opening day of ACRM testing in Auckland

Tuesday April 26th 2011, Author: Jane Eagleson, Location: New Zealand

On a day of testing the limits, Oracle Racing capsized and Emirates Team New Zealand grabbed a start mark. And that was just two of among dozens of near misses and thrills and spills - not a bad way to start the week.

Day 1 of the New Zealand test event showed the promise and potential of the upcoming America's Cup World Series as five AC45s braved gusty, blustery and variable conditions on the waters off Auckland on Tuesday.

ACRM's Race Committee team was able to test several race course configurations as well as the new Umpire system in conditions that ranged from 22-25 knots to a period when the wind dropped below 5 knots, with everything in between.

The strongest conditions came at the beginning and end of the day, and it was during and after the final start sequence of the afternoon when most of the action came.

First, the ACRM AC45 nearly capsized moments before the start, but made a remarkable recovery near the pin end. Moments later, Emirates Team New Zealand had the misfortune of getting the start mark entangled on their leeward rudder. As the boat slowed, the Kiwis too nearly capsized, before eventually freeing themselves.

All of this foreshadowed the main event - Oracle Racing, skippered by Jimmy Spithill, and fighting hard for position on the downwind leg, buried its bows and rolled into a capsize.

"We were pushing really, really hard," Spithill explained. "We ended up having a capsize, we just weren't quite set up right for that run. But it was a good experience. I think everyone will go through this... I don't think it will be the last time."

No one was injured in any of the incidents today and the Oracle Racing boat suffered minor damage to the wing. But Spithill expects to be sailing again on Wednesday.

On the race management side, Regatta Director Iain Murray also declared the day a success. "I think it's fair to say we tested a lot of things and found some we need to work on further, but at the end of the day we've brought together a bunch of teams as well as a whole lot of new systems and that's what it's all about. Generally our equipment worked and everyone is now getting familiar with it," Murray said.

"I think the teams learned a lot as well. The teams pushed it about as far as they need to push it today but everyone lives to sail another day and we'll be out there again tomorrow."

Click on images to enlarge them...


Latest Comments

  • david_collins 26/04/2011 - 13:30

    Moving the rig even further aft is the best way to mitigate "down the mine" issues. Pushing a fuller bow under water will just slow the boat quicker - not good in a puff off the wind, you need to run away from it.
  • David Bains 26/04/2011 - 11:45

    Seems incredible they can get away with only superficial damage to the wing and resume racing next day! If this is going to be a common occurrence maybe the bows should be redesigned with more bouyancy!!

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